Sleepless

Is there a yawning gap in your life?

This year marks the 14th annual World Sleep Day. It’s on March 19, 2021 and has the slogan, “Regular Sleep, Healthy Future.”

The importance of good quality sleep cannot be underestimated.  Especially when you think we spend up to a third of our lives asleep. You might think that time spent sleeping is not productive or useful, but that is far from the case. We restore ourselves while sleeping and remove metabolic waste that build up while activity. Also, studies suggest that a lack of proper sleep impairs the body’s ability to repair and heal wounds.

It is widely accepted that sleep plays an important role in memory, learning and other physiologic processes. It is thought it enables the formation of long-term memories and increases the ability to learn new information and recall it. It is also involved in the control of inflammation, hormone regulation, cardiovascular regulation and many other critical functions.  Put simply, sleep underpins our health, as well as our physical and mental wellbeing. Good quality sleep is crucial to ensure good health and quality of life.

Problems with sleep are very common. The Philips Index for Health and Well-being found that 35% of people do not feel they get enough sleep and that it impacts either our physical or mental health. Let’s not forget that sleep deprivation has been used as a form of torture and a lack of sleep can cause many psychological conditions such as depression, anxiety and, in extreme cases, psychosis. Longer term effects are being studied, but poor quality sleep or sleep deprivation are associated with significant health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, a weakened immune system and even some forms of cancers.

To help you here are some useful tips for better sleep.

  1. Try to go to bed and awake up in the morning at about the same time. A good sleep routine helps to signal to your body when to sleep and wake up.
  2. Try not to sleep in the day and if you do make it for less than an hour.
  3. Avoid alcohol consumption for four hours and caffeine for six hours before bedtime. Remember, caffeine does not just mean coffee. There is a lot of caffeine in tea, cola drinks and some other soft drinks, such as Red Bull.
  4. Smoking is bad for you anyway, but not smoking will help with sleep problems.
  5. Avoid a large meal or spicy food for four hours before bedtime. If you must eat, a small meal or snack before bed is fine.
  6. Avoid sugary foods for four hours before bedtime. Unfortunately, chocolate is doubly bad as it contains caffeine and sugar.
  7. Try to exercise regularly, but not immediately before bedtime.
  8. Make sure your bed and bedding is comfortable.
  9. Think about what is a comfortable temperature for the bedroom and try to keep it well ventilated.
  10. Block out or eliminate as much noise and light as possible.
  11. Where possible the bed and bedroom should be for sleep only. Try not to use it as an office, workshop or recreation room.
  12. Avoid using electronic devices such as mobile phones and tablets immediately before bedtime. The blue light of these device is thought to fool the body into thinking its dawn.

Using sleep aids, such as Nytol, can be a useful way to overcome short term periods of poor or disrupted sleep. These aids are only for short term use though and if you are suffering from long term problems you should seek help. Hypnotherapy can help you explore the reason for your sleeplessness and support you to address them.

To find out more about how I can help you with sleeplessness then click here

What is past life regression?

Progression through regression

What is past life regression? How does it work?

A Hypnotherapist has many techniques at their disposal to help their clients overcome problematic ailments and conditions. One of the most interesting ones, and one I specialise in, is regression. This is where the Hypnotherapist guides the client back in time to explore the root cause of a condition by finding forgotten memories stored in the subconscious mind. An example of this is a recent client who had been struggling with insomnia for many years. In his early working life he had worked at night. Using regression we were able to uncover the subconscious minds associating darkness with working rather than sleeping. Once this was discovered we were able to appeal to the subconscious to allow him to sleep at night and not prepare for work.

Interestingly, the amount of time you can go back is not limited to this life time. No one is quite sure why it works, but it does. It’s probably due to genetic memory, soul memory and reincarnation. This means our subconscious minds contain memories of other lives we have lived. It also means that these experiences and traumas can have an impact on the present day. Perhaps you are scared of dogs, even though you have always avoided them and have no real reason to fear them. Perhaps you had a bad experience with dogs in a previous life? Put simply we are a combination of all the experiences we have had over many lifetimes.

So why would I want a past life regression? Well, there can be several reasons. Firstly, if you are struggling with a problem that might be rooted in a past life this is the most effective way to resolve it. Past lives can affect many aspects of our personality, thoughts and behaviour. In some cases, past traumas can cause psychological problems or psychosomatic pain that cannot be easily resolved by conventional means.

Exploring your past lives can reveal a new understanding of your personality. This can explain why you are drawn to certain places, types of people or have a particular interest in something. This can be very rewarding and enjoyable. Frequent past life regressions mean you can start to understand your past lives in more detail, including places, names and historical periods. These can often be verified by research to provide a tremendously colourful view of your past.

One further aspect of past life regression is that groups of souls often reincarnate together. If you have ever met someone for the first time and immediately feel a connection, rapport or closeness, perhaps you have known their soul before.

To find out more about regression and what I can do for you, click here

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Smokin’ not Smoking

 

10 March 2021 is national No Smoking Day. Are you ready to stop smoking?

The writer, Mark Twain, once said, “It’s easy to quit smoking. I’ve done it hundreds of times”. I suppose me was right, as with all addictions it’s easy to stop, it’s not starting again that’s the problem. Smoking over the long term is very harmful and will likely cause severe health issues such as heart and lung problems, cancer and stroke. If you are pregnant then smoking is very harmful to your baby and you really need to try to stop.

Also, COVID-19 is a viral respiratory infection that particularly affects the lungs. If you smoke, you have an increased risk of contracting a respiratory infection and generally have more severe symptoms once infected.

If you smoke, stopping is the best thing you can do to improve your health. Even if you’ve smoked for a long time, quitting will reduce your risk of heart and circulatory diseases. It is never too late and you might notice benefits within just a few days. To find out more about this click here

It also effects those around you. Second-hand smoke, or passive smoking, is when you breathe in someone else’s cigarette smoke. Passive smoking also increases your chance of getting heart and circulatory diseases, cancer and breathing problems. With their bodies still developing, children are especially vulnerable to the effects of second-hand smoke.

Smoking is a powerful combination of habit and addiction, often with a social overtone. Addictions, such as nicotine from smoking, are difficult to overcome and you have to be motivated and in the right frame of mind to undertake the task of giving up. So, basically, are they ready? Could you be ready soon?

Wednesday 10 March 2021 is national no smoking day and now is an excellent time to stop smoking. Many of the usual routines of smoking are disrupted by the pandemic – you can’t go to the smoking area at work or smoke in the pub with your mates. Perhaps now is the time to try and succeed?

If you are really thinking of quitting, have just stopped or have been smoke free for a while then hypnotherapy can help. Hypnotherapy is most effective in supporting an imminent attempt or to help maintain an existing smoke free period by approaches such as helping to avoid triggers to smoke, boosting your will power and reducing cravings. To find out more about how I can help you, click here.